This City Has Been Hiding A Network Of Creepy Abandoned Tunnels Under It For Over 100 Years

As far as architectural structures go, there’s nothing more creepy than tunnels. They’re dark; damp; and, according to New York City folklore, there’s a terrifying centaur at the center.

It’s no wonder, then, that urban explorers are so attracted to these pieces of construction. What mysteries lie ahead in these depths that few would dare venture?

One major American city boasts a series of tunnels that have been abandoned for quite some time. When you find out what they were used for, however, you might just wonder why they’re still abandoned!

MetroCincinnati

Little is known about these tunnels, other than the fact that they have been vacant for almost a hundred years. The only people that ever go down here, for the most part, are the homeless or brave urban explorers.

MetroCincinnati

The tunnels stretch across two miles through the mystery city’s downtown neighborhoods. If you’re lucky enough to stay on the right path, you can travel through the entire system in less than an hour.

Imgur / JayKirsch

There’s definitely something creepy about these tunnels, which contain small rooms and chambers.

MetroCIncinnati

Despite how worn down it all looks, there’s still enough structural integrity that you wouldn’t have to worry about the ceiling collapsing on top of you!

MetroCincinnati

You may not know it from these images, but this subway is actually located in… Cincinnati, Ohio! Why would a major American city still have an abandoned system of tunnels beneath its surface?

MetroCincinnati

For an answer, we have to look back to the late 19th century, when Cincinnati rivaled New York City and Chicago as one of America’s most economically important areas. It even appeared to be at the center of a technological revolution when its electric streetcar completely altered public transportation as we knew it.

Facebook / Cincinnati’s Abandoned Subway

 

In 1916, voters approved a project that would turn the Miami and Erie Canal—then considered obsolete—into a 16-mile-long fast-transit loop. “Every newspaper in the city is for the Loop,” said an advertisement promoting the project. “And practically all of the business organizations as well as the trades unions…”

Facebook / Cincinnati’s Abandoned Subway

It was meant to be an inventive new subway system, but the $6 million project was postponed thanks to the first World War. Construction began in 1920 after the war ended, but other major hiccups literally stopped it in its tracks.

Facebook / Cincinnati’s Abandoned Subway

 

Prices inflated after the war, causing the project’s costs to double. When buildings on the street level began to crack due to engineering mistakes, many citizens started to disapprove of the project. Political infighting made things worse, but the Great Depression may have been the final nail in the coffin.

Facebook / Cincinnati’s Abandoned Subway

There simply wasn’t enough money or public support to complete the project, especially as motor vehicles became more and more popular. Those opposed to the system dubbed it “Cincinnati’s White Elephant.” The project was then discarded, making Cincinnati home to the nation’s largest unused and abandoned subway system.

Facebook / Cincinnati’s Abandoned Subway

The network has seven stations, with four underground and three above the ground. By the 1960s, automobiles had taken over so much that the project was completely decommissioned. The three above-ground stations were even destroyed to make room for the I-75 freeway.

Wikimedia Commons / Rufff

 

The other four underground stations are still around, though with varying degrees of quality. This one is Race Street station, which was meant to be a central hub of the system.

Wikimedia Commons / Jonathan Warren

Liberty Street Station, however, may be the most fascinating. In the 1980s, Paul Koenig, an engineering student, discovered a nuclear bunker while exploring it, complete with prepared meals, bunk beds, water, and decontamination showers.

Metro Cincinnati

 

The city is actually required to maintain these tunnels because they are located under the Central Parkway.

MetroCincinnati

Residents have tried to encourage the city to do something with the subway for years, suggesting everything from wine cellars to malls and nightclubs. It was even used as a film set for the 1995 film Batman Forever.

MetroCincinnati

A plan called “Metro Moves” in 2002 proposed to drastically change the system, but it was opposed in a two-to-one vote.

Metro Cincinnati

Finally, after a great deal of political wrangling, a new streetcar system was launched in September 2016. Known as the Cincinnati Bell Connector, it runs for 3.6 miles on a loop that brings together several sites downtown.

MetroCincinnati

Sadly, Cincinnati remains one of the biggest cities in the United States without a working mass-transit rail system, despite the fact that the city is plagued with traffic and congestion problems.

MetroCincinnati

There are still no plans to renovate the tunnels themselves, leaving it nothing more than a curiosity for now.

MetroCincinnati

It seems like Cincinnati could really use those tunnels, even if not for their original purpose! Hopefully city officials figure something out soon. In the meantime, they are sure to attract plenty of brave adventure seekers!

Share this fascinating subway with your friends below!

Source

Comments

comments

mystery